Nude Girls!

These are a series of prints I did from images of late 19th-early 20th century erotica.  They are all linocuts (a method of relief printing) on kitikata (a type of Japanese rice paper which lends itself well to relief printing).  I love the marriage of the graphic nature of the images to the graphic quality of this particular printing medium.

$325

linocut on kitikata

$325 unframed $450 framed

linocut on kitikata

$325 unframed $450 framed

linocut on kitikata

$325 unframed only

linocut on kitikata

$450

linocut on kitikata

$450

linocut on kitikata

$225 unframed $325 framed

linocut on kitikata

$225 unframed $325 framed

linocut on kitikata

linocut on kitikata

linocut on kitikata

A Loving Embrace

Let’s talk a little bit more about process. These next few proofs/prints show part of the process of an intaglio print. Again, these are etchings and used hard-ground and aquatint to make the image. I wound up printing them on colored paper. I think you can see through the progression of images here how I came to the final result. I do like to draw on my proofs; it makes me feel less precious about the work and helps me to get ideas of how I want my final image to look.

silkworm spinning a cocoon

One of the many things I love about printmaking is the ability to make one image look an infinite numbers of ways. This is an etching on a found plate with hard ground and aquatint. These three prints were done using viscosity printing techniques. The first color was carded on and wiped with the tarleton rag like a regular intaglio plate. The second color, instead of being on a second plate, is rolled on with a hard roller and ink that is more viscous than the ink used for the first color.

This print is the same plate but instead of using the viscosity method, I used chine-collé to make the second color. Chine-collé is when an image is printed on a piece of paper that is glued to another piece of paper. So here the image is printed on a colored piece of paper which is glued to a piece of white Rives BFK with wheat paste.

Clementines

These are titled, Oh, My Darlin’ I, II and III respectively.  They are color screenprints I finished printing in November 2009.  I made the stencils for each color using drawing fluid and screen-filler.  Screen-printing in particular is about form and color and creating an image from the marriage of these elements.  These images were in part inspired by the subtle sensuality found in Edward Weston’s “Natural Studies” and partly because I happened to have a bunch of clementines in my kitchen at just the right moment.